April 3, 2014
biomedicalephemera:

Reginald Southey with human and monkey skeleton
Albumen photograph by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (nom de plume Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland), 1857.
Reginald Southey was an English physician who invented a specialized cannula (tube) for draining the excess fluid from limbs suffering from edema (dropsy). He also apparently served on England’s “Lunacy Commission” so…there’s that. Southey was lifelong friends with Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and was the one who encouraged him to take up photography.
The pensive expression on Southey’s face betrays the fact that he’s standing with his arm around a skeleton rather than a live human. The composition of the photograph and the portrayal of the abnormal as mundane strikes me as incredibly reminiscent of the worlds Dodgson created in his writings.

biomedicalephemera:

Reginald Southey with human and monkey skeleton

Albumen photograph by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (nom de plume Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland), 1857.

Reginald Southey was an English physician who invented a specialized cannula (tube) for draining the excess fluid from limbs suffering from edema (dropsy). He also apparently served on England’s “Lunacy Commission” so…there’s that. Southey was lifelong friends with Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and was the one who encouraged him to take up photography.

The pensive expression on Southey’s face betrays the fact that he’s standing with his arm around a skeleton rather than a live human. The composition of the photograph and the portrayal of the abnormal as mundane strikes me as incredibly reminiscent of the worlds Dodgson created in his writings.

(via biomedicalephemera)

April 3, 2014
skullandbone:

Horse skeleton on a sand dune by Vueltaa on Flickr.

This beloved dude broke the 30k notes in a year and a half.
Thank you everyone.
L.

skullandbone:

Horse skeleton on a sand dune by Vueltaa on Flickr.

This beloved dude broke the 30k notes in a year and a half.

Thank you everyone.

L.

April 2, 2014

biomedicalephemera:

One of these things is not like the other…

First row: Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) skeleton
Second row: Hooded seal (Cystopkora cristata) skeleton
Third row: Dugong (Dugong dugon) skeleton, Brazilian sea lion (Otaria flavescens) skeleton.

*Skulls depicted are of species in the same genus as the skeleton.

Sirenia (manatees, dugongs, and sea cows) and Pinnipedia (the seals, walruses, and sea lions) are often seen as very similar, but they came from very different lineages.

While both came from land mammals (just like all sea mammals), the pinnipeds evolved from a bear-like ancestor, who returned to the sea around 28 MYA. They’re Caniformidae, or dog-like Carnivora.

The sirens evolved from the same ancestor as the hyraxes and elephants, and returned to the sea around 50 MYA. They’re only distantly related to Cetaceans and Pinnipeds.

Vergleicheende Osteologie. Edward D’alton, 1821.

(via biomedicalephemera)

March 29, 2014
Crâne d’Opossum de Virginie /  Virginia Opossum Skull (Didelphis virginiana) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

Crâne d’Opossum de Virginie / Virginia Opossum Skull (Didelphis virginiana) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

March 27, 2014
unoetrino:

via lurkrr

unoetrino:

via lurkrr

(via seiseiseitan)

March 14, 2014
fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, Hornless Titanotheres.
© The Field Museum, GEO80139.
Hornless Titanotheres Case Hall 38.
5x7 negative
2/1/1942 

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, Hornless Titanotheres.

© The Field Museum, GEO80139.

Hornless Titanotheres Case Hall 38.

5x7 negative

2/1/1942 

March 10, 2014
IMG_3991_R2 by jergam202 on Flickr.

IMG_3991_R2 by jergam202 on Flickr.

March 10, 2014
Skeletor by Pscitticine on Flickr.

Skeletor by Pscitticine on Flickr.

March 10, 2014
fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Mammal Monday, Kangaroo Mouse.
Opening later this week, The Machine Inside: Biomechanics, you can learn about how this little guy and other animals run, walk, or hop.
© The Field Museum, Z81842.
Kangaroo Mouse skeleton.
5x7 negative
7/1/1941 

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Mammal Monday, Kangaroo Mouse.

Opening later this week, The Machine Inside: Biomechanics, you can learn about how this little guy and other animals run, walk, or hop.

© The Field Museum, Z81842.

Kangaroo Mouse skeleton.

5x7 negative

7/1/1941 

March 8, 2014

labbugs:

Frog Anatomy Time! I have no idea the species for this guy, it wasn’t labeled.

I enjoyed drawing this guy even though I started his skull half a dozen times before I finally settled on it. The problem was I kept starting at his nose. The final time I started with the mid line and the back of his skull, then the rest just filled in, and I finished with the vertebrae and the scapula.

(via scientificillustration)

March 7, 2014
thebrainscoop:

Veiled chameleon, (Chamaeleo calyptratus), prepared with a process called diaphonization, or clearing and staining. The specimen undergoes a series of chemical baths including submersion in a digestive enzyme to render the tissues transparent. It is eventually placed in a soliton of alizarin, a highly pigmented red dye that bonds to the bones, and afterwards is preserved in glycerin.

thebrainscoop:

Veiled chameleon, (Chamaeleo calyptratus), prepared with a process called diaphonization, or clearing and staining. The specimen undergoes a series of chemical baths including submersion in a digestive enzyme to render the tissues transparent. It is eventually placed in a soliton of alizarin, a highly pigmented red dye that bonds to the bones, and afterwards is preserved in glycerin.

March 5, 2014
theolduvaigorge:

The Adams Mammoth by the brilliant Amherst illustrator Orra White Hitchcock 1796-1863
(Source: @Jamie_Woodward_ on Twitter)

theolduvaigorge:

The Adams Mammoth by the brilliant Amherst illustrator Orra White Hitchcock 1796-1863

(Source: @Jamie_Woodward_ on Twitter)

(via dadaunpo)

March 3, 2014
thanks to nachoes-n-cheese for the submission

thanks to nachoes-n-cheese for the submission

March 3, 2014
ennerellifal:

Canis familiaris on Flickr.
Via Flickr : This incomplete dog skeleton was found by a friend of mine (pandaaa) and I cleaned it. He was an old male hound with several pathologies due to age. Great find ! blogged : lafillerenne.fr/blog/index.php?post/2014/03/01/C-familiarisBlog // Facebook

ennerellifal:

Canis familiaris on Flickr.

Via Flickr :
This incomplete dog skeleton was found by a friend of mine (pandaaa) and I cleaned it. He was an old male hound with several pathologies due to age.
Great find !

blogged : lafillerenne.fr/blog/index.php?post/2014/03/01/C-familiaris

Blog // Facebook

March 3, 2014
Mâchoires de Requin Mako / Mako Shark Jaws (Isurus oxyrinchus) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

Mâchoires de Requin Mako / Mako Shark Jaws (Isurus oxyrinchus) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.