July 20, 2014

mucholderthen:

Dinosaur Osteology
A Primer for Paleo Illustrators
by ScottHartman

(via seiseiseitan)

June 11, 2014
Crâne de Grand Brochet / Northern Pike Skull (Esox lucius) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

Crâne de Grand Brochet / Northern Pike Skull (Esox lucius) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

June 4, 2014
Crâne de Rotengle / Common Rudd Skull (Scardinius erythrophthalmus) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

Crâne de Rotengle / Common Rudd Skull (Scardinius erythrophthalmus) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

May 23, 2014
emmaroulette:

Human vertebral column
Illustration for Prairie, a Gainesville creative writing journal
March 2014
Emma Roulette

emmaroulette:

Human vertebral column

Illustration for Prairie, a Gainesville creative writing journal

March 2014

Emma Roulette

(via scientificillustration)

May 21, 2014
HOW DO YOU DISMANTLE A BUILDING MADE OF HUMAN REMAINS? read more on Vice.com

HOW DO YOU DISMANTLE A BUILDING MADE OF HUMAN REMAINS? 
read more on Vice.com

May 19, 2014

(Source: theshallowdepths)

May 19, 2014
ennerellifal:

Capra hircus on Flickr.
Via Flickr : I have cleaned a new skeleton, a pygmy goat ! She was an old lady with a lot of bone deformities. More pictures & explanations : lafillerenne.fr/blog/index.php?post/2014/05/15/Capra-hircusBlog // Facebook // Instagram

ennerellifal:

Capra hircus on Flickr.

Via Flickr :
I have cleaned a new skeleton, a pygmy goat !
She was an old lady with a lot of bone deformities.

More pictures & explanations : lafillerenne.fr/blog/index.php?post/2014/05/15/Capra-hircus

Blog // Facebook // Instagram

May 14, 2014

Can anyone tell me if this is definitely a young badger? There is no skull with the skeleton and I’m not 100% sure

suziechaney asked for identification.
For what I can see in this photo it looks that you are right, mostly for the short claws and the skin color.
But I’m  sure that someone can tell you more things.
Thank for the submission anyway!
L.

Can anyone tell me if this is definitely a young badger? There is no skull with the skeleton and I’m not 100% sure

suziechaney asked for identification.

For what I can see in this photo it looks that you are right, mostly for the short claws and the skin color.

But I’m  sure that someone can tell you more things.

Thank for the submission anyway!

L.

May 13, 2014

wired:

You can tell a lot about the life an animal lived by looking at its skull. Big eye sockets point to a nocturnal lifestyle (big eyes harvest more light). Giant canine teeth indicate a taste for flesh. Lightweight bone riddled with air pockets is an adaptation for life on the wing. These features and many more are on display at a new exhibit, opening Friday at the California Academy of Sciences.

Visitors can see more than 640 skulls, from the 218-pound cranium of an African elephant, to the delicate skulls of tiny hummingbirds and shrews. If you go, you’re likely to see many of your favorite animals in a new light, from the surprisingly toothy hippopotamus to the surprisingly small platypus. Slow loris? Check. Anteater? You bet.

[MORE]

I’ve an Ocean between me and this exhibition, so if anyone of you is going there submit me some pics please!

Thanks L.

May 2, 2014
fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, ground sloth.
© The Field Museum, GEO80227_A.
Skeleton of extinct ground sloth. Pliocene, Argentina, Catamarca. Hall 38 Case 37.
8x10 negative
7/12/1943 

fieldmuseumphotoarchives:

Fossil Friday, ground sloth.

© The Field Museum, GEO80227_A.

Skeleton of extinct ground sloth. Pliocene, Argentina, Catamarca. Hall 38 Case 37.

8x10 negative

7/12/1943 

April 3, 2014
biomedicalephemera:

Reginald Southey with human and monkey skeleton
Albumen photograph by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (nom de plume Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland), 1857.
Reginald Southey was an English physician who invented a specialized cannula (tube) for draining the excess fluid from limbs suffering from edema (dropsy). He also apparently served on England’s “Lunacy Commission” so…there’s that. Southey was lifelong friends with Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and was the one who encouraged him to take up photography.
The pensive expression on Southey’s face betrays the fact that he’s standing with his arm around a skeleton rather than a live human. The composition of the photograph and the portrayal of the abnormal as mundane strikes me as incredibly reminiscent of the worlds Dodgson created in his writings.

biomedicalephemera:

Reginald Southey with human and monkey skeleton

Albumen photograph by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (nom de plume Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland), 1857.

Reginald Southey was an English physician who invented a specialized cannula (tube) for draining the excess fluid from limbs suffering from edema (dropsy). He also apparently served on England’s “Lunacy Commission” so…there’s that. Southey was lifelong friends with Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and was the one who encouraged him to take up photography.

The pensive expression on Southey’s face betrays the fact that he’s standing with his arm around a skeleton rather than a live human. The composition of the photograph and the portrayal of the abnormal as mundane strikes me as incredibly reminiscent of the worlds Dodgson created in his writings.

(via biomedicalephemera)

April 3, 2014
skullandbone:

Horse skeleton on a sand dune by Vueltaa on Flickr.

This beloved dude broke the 30k notes in a year and a half.
Thank you everyone.
L.

skullandbone:

Horse skeleton on a sand dune by Vueltaa on Flickr.

This beloved dude broke the 30k notes in a year and a half.

Thank you everyone.

L.

April 2, 2014

biomedicalephemera:

One of these things is not like the other…

First row: Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) skeleton
Second row: Hooded seal (Cystopkora cristata) skeleton
Third row: Dugong (Dugong dugon) skeleton, Brazilian sea lion (Otaria flavescens) skeleton.

*Skulls depicted are of species in the same genus as the skeleton.

Sirenia (manatees, dugongs, and sea cows) and Pinnipedia (the seals, walruses, and sea lions) are often seen as very similar, but they came from very different lineages.

While both came from land mammals (just like all sea mammals), the pinnipeds evolved from a bear-like ancestor, who returned to the sea around 28 MYA. They’re Caniformidae, or dog-like Carnivora.

The sirens evolved from the same ancestor as the hyraxes and elephants, and returned to the sea around 50 MYA. They’re only distantly related to Cetaceans and Pinnipeds.

Vergleicheende Osteologie. Edward D’alton, 1821.

(via biomedicalephemera)

March 29, 2014
Crâne d’Opossum de Virginie /  Virginia Opossum Skull (Didelphis virginiana) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

Crâne d’Opossum de Virginie / Virginia Opossum Skull (Didelphis virginiana) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

March 27, 2014
unoetrino:

via lurkrr

unoetrino:

via lurkrr

(via seiseiseitan)