April 16, 2014
ennerellifal:

pinnipeds on Flickr.
Via Flickr : An harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and south american fur seal (Arctocephalus australis). I wrote an article about phylogenetics and pinnipeds (french, sorry) with many pictures : lafillerenne.fr/blog/index.php?post/2014/04/14/Pinnipedes…Blog // Facebook // Instagram

ennerellifal:

pinnipeds on Flickr.

Via Flickr :
An harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) and south american fur seal (Arctocephalus australis).

I wrote an article about phylogenetics and pinnipeds (french, sorry) with many pictures :
lafillerenne.fr/blog/index.php?post/2014/04/14/Pinnipedes…

Blog // Facebook // Instagram

April 10, 2014
ryanmatthewcohn:

Dissected 6-part human skull I just completed. These can be made custom. Contact me at info@ryanmatthewcohn.com for more information. #humanskull #realskull #anatomy #anatomical #medicalskull #oddities #antique #cabinetofcuriosites #explodedskull

ryanmatthewcohn:

Dissected 6-part human skull I just completed. These can be made custom. Contact me at info@ryanmatthewcohn.com for more information. #humanskull #realskull #anatomy #anatomical #medicalskull #oddities #antique #cabinetofcuriosites #explodedskull

April 8, 2014
victoriousvocabulary:

SCHEDEL
[noun]
1. a skull.
2. a death’s head; a human skull, as symbol of death. 
Etymology: Dutch, from Middle Dutch schedele, from Old Dutch skēthila, *skeithila, “part, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Germanic *skaidilō, “part in the hair, top, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Indo-European *skÁit-, “to cut, part, separate”. Cognate with German Scheitel, “part, crest, apex”.
[Sierk van Meeuwen]

victoriousvocabulary:

SCHEDEL

[noun]

1. a skull.

2. a death’s head; a human skull, as symbol of death. 

Etymology: Dutch, from Middle Dutch schedele, from Old Dutch skēthila, *skeithila, “part, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Germanic *skaidilō, “part in the hair, top, crown, crest, summit”, from Proto-Indo-European *skÁit-, “to cut, part, separate”. Cognate with German Scheitel, “part, crest, apex”.

[Sierk van Meeuwen]

(via unoetrino)

April 8, 2014
emmaroulette:

Skull of the American Bison (Bison bison)
Emma Roulette
March 2014

emmaroulette:

Skull of the American Bison (Bison bison)

Emma Roulette

March 2014

(via scientificillustration)

April 3, 2014
biomedicalephemera:

Reginald Southey with human and monkey skeleton
Albumen photograph by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (nom de plume Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland), 1857.
Reginald Southey was an English physician who invented a specialized cannula (tube) for draining the excess fluid from limbs suffering from edema (dropsy). He also apparently served on England’s “Lunacy Commission” so…there’s that. Southey was lifelong friends with Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and was the one who encouraged him to take up photography.
The pensive expression on Southey’s face betrays the fact that he’s standing with his arm around a skeleton rather than a live human. The composition of the photograph and the portrayal of the abnormal as mundane strikes me as incredibly reminiscent of the worlds Dodgson created in his writings.

biomedicalephemera:

Reginald Southey with human and monkey skeleton

Albumen photograph by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (nom de plume Lewis Caroll, author of Alice in Wonderland), 1857.

Reginald Southey was an English physician who invented a specialized cannula (tube) for draining the excess fluid from limbs suffering from edema (dropsy). He also apparently served on England’s “Lunacy Commission” so…there’s that. Southey was lifelong friends with Charles Lutwidge Dodgson and was the one who encouraged him to take up photography.

The pensive expression on Southey’s face betrays the fact that he’s standing with his arm around a skeleton rather than a live human. The composition of the photograph and the portrayal of the abnormal as mundane strikes me as incredibly reminiscent of the worlds Dodgson created in his writings.

(via biomedicalephemera)

April 3, 2014
thebrainscoop:

Marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) - collected in the Galapagos, 1933. Their unique teeth are adapted for feeding on marine algae; additionally, these marine reptiles have the ability to secrete salt from a specialized nasal gland, allowing them to subsist in the sea. Darwin thought they were super ugly when he first saw them, but haters gonna hate. (at The Field Museum)

thebrainscoop:

Marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) - collected in the Galapagos, 1933. Their unique teeth are adapted for feeding on marine algae; additionally, these marine reptiles have the ability to secrete salt from a specialized nasal gland, allowing them to subsist in the sea. Darwin thought they were super ugly when he first saw them, but haters gonna hate. (at The Field Museum)

April 3, 2014
skullandbone:

Horse skeleton on a sand dune by Vueltaa on Flickr.

This beloved dude broke the 30k notes in a year and a half.
Thank you everyone.
L.

skullandbone:

Horse skeleton on a sand dune by Vueltaa on Flickr.

This beloved dude broke the 30k notes in a year and a half.

Thank you everyone.

L.

April 3, 2014
ennerellifal:

film on Flickr.Via Flickr :Cow tarsus.
//Canon AE-1 Program
//50mm f/1.8
//Lomography 400Blog // Facebook // Instagram

ennerellifal:

film on Flickr.

Via Flickr :
Cow tarsus.

//Canon AE-1 Program
//50mm f/1.8
//Lomography 400

Blog // Facebook // Instagram

1:16pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZRGLQy1B_Kqqz
  
Filed under: cow tarsus bone bones 
April 2, 2014

biomedicalephemera:

One of these things is not like the other…

First row: Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus) skeleton
Second row: Hooded seal (Cystopkora cristata) skeleton
Third row: Dugong (Dugong dugon) skeleton, Brazilian sea lion (Otaria flavescens) skeleton.

*Skulls depicted are of species in the same genus as the skeleton.

Sirenia (manatees, dugongs, and sea cows) and Pinnipedia (the seals, walruses, and sea lions) are often seen as very similar, but they came from very different lineages.

While both came from land mammals (just like all sea mammals), the pinnipeds evolved from a bear-like ancestor, who returned to the sea around 28 MYA. They’re Caniformidae, or dog-like Carnivora.

The sirens evolved from the same ancestor as the hyraxes and elephants, and returned to the sea around 50 MYA. They’re only distantly related to Cetaceans and Pinnipeds.

Vergleicheende Osteologie. Edward D’alton, 1821.

(via biomedicalephemera)

March 31, 2014
thebrainscoop:

Crocodylia - skulls of American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), and crocodile sp. Similar animals began to show up in the fossil record as much as 230mya, but modern-day members of Crocodylia have remain largely unchanged for the last 80my, and out-survived the dinosaurs that perished during the mass extinction event signaling the end of the Cretaceous period 66mya. This is sorta crazy, considering modern-day humans diverged from our closest relatives only about 500,000 years ago. Lol. (at The Field Museum)

thebrainscoop:

Crocodylia - skulls of American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), and crocodile sp. Similar animals began to show up in the fossil record as much as 230mya, but modern-day members of Crocodylia have remain largely unchanged for the last 80my, and out-survived the dinosaurs that perished during the mass extinction event signaling the end of the Cretaceous period 66mya. This is sorta crazy, considering modern-day humans diverged from our closest relatives only about 500,000 years ago. Lol. (at The Field Museum)

March 31, 2014
thebrainscoop:

Those teeth.
The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) was one of the last of the Ice Age megafauna to go extinct, around 10,000 BCE. At this time humans were expanding globally, domesticating animals, and exploring the potential of agricultural farming - all while these creatures roamed the countryside, occasionally wandering into tar pits. (at Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits)

thebrainscoop:

Those teeth.

The Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) was one of the last of the Ice Age megafauna to go extinct, around 10,000 BCE. At this time humans were expanding globally, domesticating animals, and exploring the potential of agricultural farming - all while these creatures roamed the countryside, occasionally wandering into tar pits. (at Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits)

March 29, 2014
Crâne d’Opossum de Virginie /  Virginia Opossum Skull (Didelphis virginiana) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

Crâne d’Opossum de Virginie / Virginia Opossum Skull (Didelphis virginiana) by JC-Osteo on Flickr.

March 29, 2014
scientificvisuals:

thebrainscoop:

shadowskittle:

Timelapse for the two-faced calfs skull being cleaned by the beetles.
I just thought it was the coolest thing ever so I tried to make a gif.
(x)

nom noM NOM NOM NOM 

A great way to pick bones clean without harming them? Unleash the dermestid beetles, preferably the hide beetle Dermestes maculatus. They eat flesh.

The one I did didn’t works well as your

scientificvisuals:

thebrainscoop:

shadowskittle:

Timelapse for the two-faced calfs skull being cleaned by the beetles.

I just thought it was the coolest thing ever so I tried to make a gif.

(x)

nom noM NOM NOM NOM 

A great way to pick bones clean without harming them? Unleash the dermestid beetles, preferably the hide beetle Dermestes maculatus. They eat flesh.

The one I did didn’t works well as your

(via coolsciencegifs)

March 29, 2014
pidraws:

Micronycteris megalotis ventral skulls! I’m taking a scientific illustration class finally and learning how to do this for real, which is exciting.
I’m also learning how weird drafting film is to draw on. 

pidraws:

Micronycteris megalotis ventral skulls! I’m taking a scientific illustration class finally and learning how to do this for real, which is exciting.

I’m also learning how weird drafting film is to draw on. 

(via scientificillustration)

March 29, 2014
ryanmatthewcohn:

Visited the amazing Museum Fragonard while in Paris. This is a cabinet showing various deformities on horses. #osteology #fragonard #skull #skulls #oddities #pathological #anatomy #anatomical

ryanmatthewcohn:

Visited the amazing Museum Fragonard while in Paris. This is a cabinet showing various deformities on horses. #osteology #fragonard #skull #skulls #oddities #pathological #anatomy #anatomical